Apple Resumes iPhone X Production in Face of Weak XS Sales →

November 22, 2018 · 23:06

Jon Porter, for The Verge:

Apple has resumed production of the iPhone X due to weaker than expected demand for its latest XS and XS Max models, according to a report by The Wall Street Journal. The move is allegedly due to an agreement made with Samsung to purchase a certain quantity of OLED screens. With this year’s OLED-equipped models failing to sell in the quantities needed to fulfill the terms of the deal, the report suggests that Apple is turning to last year’s model for a solution. Apple ceased selling the iPhone X in stores when the XS was first released.

If this turns out to be true, I’d be very surprised. Perhaps less so, if these phones only ended up in carriers’ hands, but this would be without precedent.


‘AirPower Really Is Well and Truly Fucked’ →

September 17, 2018 · 11:52

John Gruber, on Daring Fireball:

What I’ve heard, third-hand but from multiple little birdies, is that AirPower really is well and truly fucked. Something about the multi-coil design getting too hot — way too hot. There are engineers who looked at AirPower’s design and said it could never work, thermally, and now those same engineers have that “told you so” smug look on their faces. Last year Apple was apparently swayed by arguments that they could figure out a way to make it not get hot. They were, clearly, wrong. I think they’ve either had to go completely back to the drawing board and start over with an entirely different design, or they’ve decided to give up and they just don’t want to say so.

Meanwhile we now have two generations of iPhone’s supporting inductive charging and one of the best chargers for them are from Samsung, though the new Logitech Powered seems like an interesting proposition.


I Wouldn’t Expect a Cheaper iPhone X After What Tim Cook Said Last Night

May 2, 2018 · 12:47

Tim Cook on Apple’s earning’s call:

We were surprised, somewhat, that through all of this period of time that the iPhone X winds up at the most popular for every week of the time since the launch and so that’s, I think, a powerful point. And it’s number one in China, which is another powerful point. And so obviously at some point if those technologies move to lower price points and that [inaudible] probably more unit demand. But the way we think about is trying to price a reasonable price for the value that we deliver and I feel that we did that.

There were plenty of recent rumours suggesting the iPhone X’s price would go down by $100 to $899, perhaps also to make way for an iPhone X Plus at the $999 price point. After hearing Tim’s remarks on the X last night, I wouldn’t expect the price to go down anytime soon — the iPhone X is selling extremely well, and people are voting with their wallets by buying them. You just don’t walk away from that as Apple.

I hope I’m wrong.

(You can find a full transcript of the call on iMore.)


iPhone X/8 Wireless Charging Will Wear Out the Battery Faster Than Cable Charging →

March 13, 2018 · 10:42

Adrian Kingsley-Hughes, on ZDNet:

The issue is that when the iPhone is being charged using a cable, the phone is being powered by the cord (there is some load on the battery, but it’s minimal), but when using wireless charging, the battery is what’s powering the iPhone, with the wireless charger only being used to top up the battery. This means that by switching from a cable to a wireless charger, my battery isn’t getting a break, and in turn, this is making me go through recharge cycles at an even faster rate.

This is an interesting fact, but I’m pretty sure the impact is minimal, especially considering that most of the new iPhone X users use their phones more often now, because of all the new stuff, which could account for the increased battery cycles. I know I use mine more often — I was so bored with the iPhone 6-7 form factor than I just reached for my iPad whenever possible.

The truth is that wireless charging is more convenient at times and I just don’t want to sacrifice that for a few more charge cycles. A replacement battery is cheap enough, that I’ll just get that when I need to.


ASUS ZenFone 5 — Designed to Look Like an iPhone X →

March 6, 2018 · 07:38

Ian Cutress, for AnandTech:

Today ASUS is launching a smartphone that is designed, according to the speaker at our prebriefing, to make it look like the user is holding an iPhone X. The new ASUS ZenFone 5, part of the ZenFone 5 family, comes with a notch. Apparently this is what the company says that its customers want: the ability to look as if you have an iPhone X, but have something else.

Am I in a dream? I really need to take the blue pill.

P.S. Yes, I’m behind on my RSS.


February 25, 2018 · 14:57

This is the first time in many years that I still consider my iPhone X — I’m now into over three months using it daily — still a novelty. It still excites me whenever I take it out of my pocket. I continuously stare at the gorgeous screen, not quite believing that this tech is possible today. And no, the notch doesn’t bother me. At all.

This happened twice so far (I owned every single iPhone model, apart from the 3G, 5C and SE) — with the first iPhone and then with the iPhone 4, when it went Retina.

The iPhone X is a milestone and I can’t help but wonder, when the next one comes along, will it be an iPhone? Or a smartphone at all?


iPhone X — Picking Up Scratches →

January 31, 2018 · 12:30

Stephen Hackett, on 512 Pixels:

Unfortunately, the stainless steel band isn’t the only thing that has picked up scratches on my iPhone X. This phone has picked up scratches across the front and back glass in a way no previous iPhone I have owned has. None of them are particularly long, but they are deep enough that I can catch them with the corner of a finger nail if I try.

I have now heard numerous reports about people having scratches on the band, front, and back glass. The strange thing is that I use my iPhone X caseless (white model) and it still looks pristine. I carry it in my jeans every day and use it in a vent mount in my car. Granted, I don’t throw it around and I am careful, but so were the people who have scratches now.


“Face ID Is a Mistake Disguised as Courage” →

December 28, 2017 · 12:39

Paul Thurrott’s piece on the iPhone X caught my eye because of his take on Apple’s design decisions:

Apple’s iPhone X is chock-full of new technologies and features, and it has a modern, elegant design that I feel will stand the test of time. But it is also more expensive than any other mainstream smartphone. And it has a few bad design choices that may limit its appeal.

My own complaints are mainly focused around iOS 11 itself, but I was curious on Paul’s take.

[…] some smartphones even offer more technically impressive designs. Samsung’s flagships offer displays that gracefully curve around the edges of the device, creating a truly bezel-less effect. And few phones stick an ungainly notch into the top of the display, ruining the infinity pool effect.

I spent a month with the S8 and S8+ — they are impressive — but if there was one thing I wish they didn’t have, it’s the curved glass. Terrible, terrible decision.

The notch is a problem. We must discuss the notch.

The notch is the wrong decision, and it’s one that Apple, and iPhone users, will now need to deal with for years. And it is the wrong decision on a number of levels.

From a looks perspective, the notch is an unnecessary, jarring interruption of an otherwise beautiful looking visual design. There is an elegance to the curves of the display and the surrounding frame, which match each other perfectly … except for that notch. It’s an affront. An intrusion. And despite assurances from some others I know who own the iPhone X—opinions differ on this one, apparently—you never really do get used to it. It’s like a mote in your eye, always in the way.

It is an affront, but at the same time, strangely enough, I barely notice it.

Apple should have done what Samsung did with its 2017 flagships, what OnePlus did with the 5T, and what virtually all other smartphone makers will do when they adopt this more design in other devices: Just put a bit of bezel at the top of the device. There is no need to intrude into the display.

I’m sure they considered this, but the iPhone would then look like every other phone on the market. My friend recently held up an LG V30 and even seeing it up close, I had to look for the logo — I thought it was the new Samsung set to ship in January.

But design is about more than just looks. Design also encompasses how a thing works. And notch or not, Apple needed some space at the top of the device to house the optical elements that were required for the iPhone X’s terrible Face ID technology.

Terrible? This will be interesting.

And Face ID is terrible by any meaningful metric. I’ll get into this more in the Security section of this review. But the short version is that this design is an unnecessary compromise and inconvenience. A rear-mounted fingerprint reader would have been hugely preferable. This is the iPhone X’s version of the missing headphone jack: A mistake disguised as courage.

Face ID has thus far, subjectively, surpassed all my expectations, beating Touch ID in every single “metric”. Which are the “meaningful” ones, I wonder?

It’s a shame that it needs to be protected with a case. Which it does, given its slippery and non-durable all-glass design.

Still rocking mine without a case1. It’s also notably less slippery than the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus.

To display the App Switcher, you swipe up from the bottom of the screen and hold.

You don’t need to hold. Just arc your gesture and the App Switcher will appear. This was a huge mistake on Apple’s part, when they demoed the iPhone X gestures during the keynote.

To access Control Center, you now swipe down from the top right of the screen. This is, of course, different from all other iOS-based devices, where you swipe up from the bottom of the screen to access this interface. But it’s easily learned.

This is the one gesture which is terrible beyond words.

Since Paul doesn’t mind, we obviously have completely different points of view.

The iPhone X display features HDR capabilities plus Apple’s excellent True Tone technologies, which subtly and dynamically color the display to match the light in your surroundings. This is the best implementation of this kind of thing I’ve ever seen—it debuted on the iPad Pro—and it makes reading, especially, delightful no matter where you are at the time.

Whenever I see a screen without True Tone now, I cringe. It’s that good.

The problem with this approach is that great low-light cameras, like that in the Pixel 2 XL, actually use the darkness to great effect: Instead of lighting up the scene, they let you tap to focus on a lit area and create a much more attractive—and sometimes even surreal—photo in which colors and lights pop in the darkness. With the iPhone X, all you usually get is a scene that is as evenly lit as possible, given the conditions.

If Paul bothered to tap the screen, focusing on the light bulb in the iPhone shot, he would have gotten the same effect. Proof below.

Portrait Lighting only works with the selfie camera.

Nope. It works with the rear cameras too.

Apple’s use of facial recognition is inarguably the most controversial aspect of the iPhone X. It is also, I think, the iPhone X’s Achilles Heel.

Yes, Face ID works as good, if not better than, any facial recognition system I’ve used. But it’s not particularly fast or convenient when you factor in the time and effort it takes to actually sign-in: You also need to swipe up on the screen in order to actually access the home screen or whatever app you were previously using. It’s tedious.

Effort? What effort? I already have the phone in front of me — the rest is automatic.

I start swiping before the iPhone is in front of my face, in a position where I always hold smartphones. Face ID does the rest in the background. You don’t have to wait for Face ID to unlock before you start swiping.

Worse, it’s time-consuming: Face ID is not nearly as fast as using the Touch ID fingerprint sensor that Apple placed on previous iPhones. And in denying users that option—it could have, and should have, simply put Touch ID on the back of the iPhone X—it has created an all or nothing dilemma for customers. Face ID is easily the worst thing about the iPhone X. Easily.

It’s faster in the 48 days that I’ve used it, even more so when I take into account all the situations when Touch ID fails (multiple times per day). Face ID has failed me twice so far. Not bad. And it’s easily the best new feature of the iPhone X. Easily.

And you will need to use Face ID. To sign-in to your device, over and over again. To use Apple Pay. To approve purchases in the Store. Until of course, you can’t: For reasons I can’t quite explain, I’ve had to type in my Apple ID password—my freaking password, in 2017—more on the iPhone X than I have in years.

Once a Touch ID iPhone was unlocked, the user could get into almost everything, including signing into websites, whose passwords were stored in iCloud Keychain. Not so on the X. Before the iPhone X pastes in your login data, in Safari for example, it verifies that the user is still the owner of the phone. This additional security is priceless.

God, I miss Touch ID.

I don’t. And I can’t wait for Face ID on the iPad and Mac.

Video playback is problematic too, thanks to the notch. You have two choices: You can let the notch intrude into the video, as shown here.

Or you can crop it so that there are black bars on both sides. No, neither is ideal.

This is the result of going to taller that 16:9 screens, which Paul earlier calls “correct”:

Granted, other smartphone makers delivered what is now correctly viewed as the standard for modern flagships—tall, 18:9-ish displays with tiny bezels—well before Apple did with the iPhone X.

Come on Paul, every single taller or wider than 16:9, depending on orientation, screen is going to exhibit this behaviour.

There is no way around this: The iPhone X is expensive. Too expensive, I think.

I completely agree. To some, the price is justifiable, but not to most. I don’t consider the X to be worth the $1430 it costs in Poland. Not even close.

Compared to other flagships smartphones, the iPhone X is crazy-expensive. You can get an excellent Samsung Galaxy S8 or S8+ at a steep discount right now, and these devices feature even more impressive displays than Apple’s offering.

More impressive only considering it’s discounted to half the price of the X. If we remove the pricing factor, it is not superior.


I understand that these are Paul’s subjective views on the X, but I just cannot comprehend how he sees Face ID as the Xs biggest weakness.

  1. Touch wood.

iPhone X Facial Recognition Will Not Meet Expectations →

October 30, 2017 · 16:40

Paul Thurrott:

Well, now it’s going with plan C. Which is to seed the press with the bad news that this technology does not work very well. In doing so, it can temper expectations for the product and assure that only its most-forgiving fans will buy an iPhone X, preventing the public embarrassment of rampant complaints.

“Apple quietly told suppliers they could reduce the accuracy of the face-recognition technology to make it easier to manufacture, according to people familiar with the situation,” Bloomberg reported. “A less accurate Face ID will still be far better than the existing Touch ID [but] the company’s decision to downgrade the technology for this model shows how hard it’s becoming to create cutting-edge features that consumers are hungry to try.”

I’m sorry, what? “A less accurate Face ID will still be far better than the existing Touch ID”? That cannot be true. Touch ID is fantastic. Even a full-working Face ID would likely not be as good.

I’m sorry, what?

Nobody outside of Apple has yet publicly tested this technology (until today, when the first YouTube hands-on videos showed up — I wrote these words a few days ago). We know next to nothing how it will realistically function in the real world. Apple has denied Bloomberg’s report, which is a rare step for them. I see this as Bloomberg getting the story either completely wrong, or completely right. However, until we get to test and compare it to Touch ID, we have essentially no viable information to use. Bloomberg could just as well be talking about the system that Apple showed off at the last keynote — the allegedly “downgraded” one. Or not.

Both Bloomberg’s and Paul’s articles are just clickbait at this point, making assumptions which are pure conjecture and speculation.


About Face ID advanced technology →

October 19, 2017 · 12:21

Apple published a support document, detailing some interesting features and functions of Face ID.

Face ID automatically adapts to changes in your appearance, such as wearing cosmetic makeup or growing facial hair. If there is a more significant change in your appearance, like shaving a full beard, Face ID confirms your identity by using your passcode before it updates your face data. Face ID is designed to work with hats, scarves, glasses, contact lenses, and many sunglasses. Furthermore, it’s designed to work indoors, outdoors, and even in total darkness.

Face ID will be a problem for people who use anti-smog masks, which is pretty much most of Asia. This could be potentially solved by enrolling two faces — with and without a mask on — but as far I as understand, it is currently only possible to enroll one face per device. This could change in the future.

Face ID data – including mathematical representations of your face – is encrypted and protected with a key available only to the Secure Enclave.

The probability that a random person in the population could look at your iPhone X and unlock it using Face ID is approximately 1 in 1,000,000 (versus 1 in 50,000 for Touch ID). As an additional protection, Face ID allows only five unsuccessful match attempts before a passcode is required. The statistical probability is different for twins and siblings that look like you and among children under the age of 13, because their distinct facial features may not have fully developed. If you’re concerned about this, we recommend using a passcode to authenticate.

I would be extremely interested in seeing Face ID tested on twins. Luckily, I’m sure someone will attempt to.

Face ID matches against depth information, which isn’t found in print or 2D digital photographs. It’s designed to protect against spoofing by masks or other techniques through the use of sophisticated anti-spoofing neural networks. Face ID is even attention-aware. It recognizes if your eyes are open and looking towards the device. This makes it more difficult for someone to unlock your iPhone without your knowledge (such as when you are sleeping).

I won’t even try spoofing it with a photo, like I successfully spoofed my review Galaxy S8 — I’m pretty sure they got this covered.

Face ID data – including mathematical representations of your face – is encrypted and protected by the Secure Enclave. This data will be refined and updated as you use Face ID to improve your experience, including when you successfully authenticate. Face ID will also update this data when it detects a close match but a passcode is subsequently entered to unlock the device.

Face ID data doesn’t leave your device and is never backed up to iCloud or anywhere else.

Piece of mind.

Even if you don’t enroll in Face ID, the TrueDepth camera intelligently activates to support attention aware features, like dimming the display if you aren’t looking at your iPhone or lowering the volume of alerts if you’re looking at your device. For example, when using Safari, your device will check to determine if you’re looking at your device and turns the screen off if you aren’t. If you don’t want to use these features, you can open Settings > General > Accessibility, and disable Attention Aware Features.

Others have done this before, but it appears that Apple’s approach to implementing this feature is superior — at least it won’t pause playing video when a person looks away.

Within supported apps, you can enable Face ID for authentication. Apps are only notified as to whether the authentication is successful. Apps can’t access Face ID data associated with the enrolled face.

Craig Federighi already mentioned that apps not updated to support Face ID, but which support Touch ID, will work “out-of-the-box”.

The system will not cause any harm to eyes or skin, due to its low output. It’s important to know that the infrared emitters could be damaged during repair or disassembly, so your iPhone should always be serviced by Apple or an authorized service provider. The TrueDepth camera system incorporates tamper-detection features. If tampering is detected, the system may be disabled for safety reasons.

I’m sure some people will complain about issues with their TrueDepth camera being deactivated after an unauthorised screen exchange or some other service work, but I prefer to have piece of mind in this regard.


While I’m still not sold on Face ID — it could turn out to be a hassle — I’m very curious about the attention-aware features. Those could be a really nice perk.


A Thousand Yes’ For Every No →

October 7, 2017 · 16:14

Joshua Topolsky:

Plenty has been written about the mind-numbing, face-palming, irritating stupidity of the notch. And yet, I can’t stop thinking about it. I would love to say that this awful design compromise is an anomaly for Apple. But it would be more accurate to describe it as the norm.

iPhone always were (and still are) distinguished by the rather obvious round home button — with it gone, they would just look like any other. I’m guessing this is one of the reasons that they chose to go with the ears and notch, which allow the screen to be almost bezel-less, creating a unique front design.

This doesn’t mean that we should adore it — I’m still on the fence, but leaning towards not liking it — or even accept it. Apple’s not forcing us to buy this model, but I wish they hid the notch, or even added a small chin and forehead to the design, a bit akin to the Galaxy S8. I’m pretty sure some are going to love the new design and gestures, while others will hate readjusting to the new paradigm. Personally, I’m worried about the pause needed, when swiping up, to get to the app switcher — pauses disrupt gestures.

I can’t help but think that the old “a thousand no’s for every yes” is near gone from Apple’s culture. I hope not, but looking at the big picture, it sure seems like it.


UI Design for iPhone X: Top Elements and the Notch →

October 6, 2017 · 14:07

Max Rudberg:

Regardless of your feelings for the notch, the reality is that to do a near edge-to-edge screen on a phone in 2017; you need to make place for sensors and speaker. The technology to hide them behind the screen simply is not here. We’ve seen different manufacturers choose different solutions to the problem. This is the one Apple chose, so let’s work with what we got.

People will get over the notch sooner or later, but I’ll bet the jokes will be piling on for years to come. Personally, I’m still undecided — I will need to see it in person first.

Oh! Make sure to check out Max’s post — lots of good, sensible design information there.


Designing Websites for iPhone X →

September 23, 2017 · 10:53

Timothy Horton details how to design websites around the notch, to take full advantage of the iPhone X’s display:

Out of the box, Safari displays your existing websites beautifully on the edge-to-edge display of the new iPhone X. Content is automatically inset within the display’s safe area so it is not obscured by the rounded corners, or the device’s sensor housing.

I’m curious to see how websites will creatively use the notch to their benefit. I have a few ideas myself, but nothing solid yet.


Report Repeats Rumors of Larger 6.5-Inch iPhone for Next Year →

September 17, 2017 · 14:12

Ben Lovejoy:

Hinting at a source within Samsung Display, the report suggests that next year’s iPhone will be offered in two sizes: a 5.85-inch one with the same screen size as the iPhone 8, and a larger 6.46-inch ‘Plus’ model …

I strongly believe that Apple will at one point finally retire the current iPhone 6/6S/7/8 design and focus on the “edge-to-edge” design of the iPhone X. While they could simplify their lineup drastically, offering only an iPhone X in two sizes, they currently sell eight (8!) different iPhones — the 6S and 6S Plus, 7 and 7 Plus, 8 and 8 Plus, SE, and X1. Ideally, they would reduce that to three — an iPhone X with ~5”, 5.8″, and ~6.5“ displays — like they did with the iPads.

It will be interesting to watch how they handle the whole transition over the next few years.

  1. Elon Musk must be furious.

Apple to Reveal Steve Jobs Theatre on September 12, 2017 →

September 7, 2017 · 11:55

Alex Webb:

The entrance to the venue sits underneath a silver disc, whose supporting glass panels make it seem to float 20 feet above the surrounding clearing. The auditorium itself occupies four underground stories, and to get there, journalists will descend a staircase spiraling down alongside the walls.

It also boasts two custom-made rotating elevators, which turn as they ascend and descend so that passengers enter and exit by the same door even as they go in and out from different directions. So far, so Apple—the more elegant single door, with its complex engineering, preferred to the more obvious double-door solution.

Once CEO Tim Cook and his cohorts finish showing off the new iPhones, Apple Watch and TV onstage, a surprise will await the departing attendees. An inside wall, which obscures a hollow space below the floating saucer, will retract to reveal the product demonstration room, according to someone with knowledge of the design. For fellow Brits: think the Thunderbird 3 launchpad underneath Tracy Island’s circular pool house.

I’m sure the new iPhone will be great, but this new building has me more excited at the moment.


How Apple Could Change the Way You Use the Next iPhone →

August 30, 2017 · 14:08

Mark Gurman, writing for Bloomberg:

[…] Apple has tested the complete removal of the home button—even a digital one—in favor of new gesture controls for tasks like going to the main app grid and opening multitasking, according to the people and the images.

The paragraph above doesn’t seem to indicate that this is how Apple solved (or will solve) the problem. Mark just says that this is something that has been tested.

Across the bottom of the screen there’s a thin, software bar in lieu of the home button. A user can drag it up to the middle of the screen to open the phone. When inside an app, a similar gesture starts multitasking. From here, users can continue to flick upwards to close the app and go back to the home screen. An animation in testing sucks the app back into its icon. The multitasking interface has been redesigned to appear like a series of standalone cards that can be swiped through, versus the stack of cards on current iPhones, the images show.

This solution, heavily relying on gestures, could potentially be much more time-consuming than just hitting the home button. Again, this could or could not make it to iOS 11 on the ‘iPhone 8’.


There seems to be no other new information from Mark in his latest piece and the original headline is a bit misleading, so I rewrote it.


Apple ‘Aiming To Use’ Steve Jobs Theatre for iPhone 8 Launch →

August 28, 2017 · 16:36

Benjamin Mayo:

The Wall Street Journal is reporting that Apple has indeed scheduled an event on September 12. On that date, Apple is set to announce the new iPhone models, as well as cellular Apple Watch and a 4K Apple TV set-top box. We are still waiting for Apple to send out invites to press to make the event official, although it is all but confirmed at this point.

In terms of event location, the report says that the company is ‘aiming to use’ the Steve Jobs Theater in Apple Park for the first time …

I’m pretty sure Apple Park is amazing to behold for the first time, from an architectural point of view especially, but I would love to be able to see the inside of the Steve Jobs Theatre at least once in my lifetime.


$999 iPhone? →

August 28, 2017 · 10:23

Brian X. Chen, writing for The New York Times:

Chief among the changes for the new iPhones: refreshed versions, including a premium model priced at around $999, according to people briefed on the product, who asked to remain anonymous because they were not authorized to speak publicly.

This wouldn’t at all surprise me. Unfortunately, this is not a phone that I would consider buying and it has nothing to do with whether I can afford it or not — I just refuse to pay that much for a smartphone, which is close to or more than my MacBook Pro1. What’s even more frustrating is that if the pricing speculations are accurate, the new ‘iPhone Pro’ will be at least 50% dearer than a Galaxy S8 in Poland.

  1. EU prices additionally are much higher than those in the US.

Embrace the Notch! →

August 3, 2017 · 10:00

Max Rudberg:

Beforehand I was fond of the idea of blending the statusbar with the hardware, but seeing the mockups like this, I’m not so sure. Blending the statusbar with the hardware makes the screen seem smaller than it is and the result is less striking. I’m now leaning towards that Apple will embrace the notch.

I’m voting for embracing the notch, because it could play well into Apple showcasing how large the screen’s area really is. Then again, they could be conservative, so as not to alienate those who hate that look.

 

Photo credit: Max Rudberg


iPhone 8 Code Name and Image Found in Homepod Firmware

July 31, 2017 · 08:39

Steven did a little sleuthing over the weekend, poking around the HomePod firmware…

Pearl ID and BiometricKit found, but still no word whether the iPhone 8/Pro (or whatever else Apple will call it) will have Touch ID along facial recognition.

Guilherme Rambo‏ also found an image representing the new iPhone, which Steven confirmed, along with its D22 code name.


Someone at Apple is going to have an angry phone call today…


iPhone 8 Plus With Two Different Screen Technologies →

November 16, 2016 · 09:07

Zac Hall:

According to the report, Apple is expected to introduce three new iPhone models in 2017. One model will feature the OLED display, while two models will continue to use the TFT-LCD technology. The dual camera introduced on the iPhone 7 Plus will continue to only be offered on the 5.5-inch models, not the 4.7-inch model.

This seems unrealistic. Screen technology is not a differentiator. I also doubt people would want to pay more just for an OLED screen.